The Definitive Guide to Fauxing Wine Snobbery

After the Pulitzer Prize-winning success of my prior Definitive Guide, I’ve authored a new list for dealing with a much-lamented type of person: the wine snob. When dealing with a wine snob, it doesn’t matter if you’re a Level 2 Somm or on your 3rd fake i.d., the formula for putting said snob in their place is always the same: 3 parts wit to 1 part bitchiness with a dash of B.S. and garnish of actual facts.

The Definitive Guide to Fauxing Wine Snobbery

aka how to out-snob the snob

fuck yo grapes


1. The “Oh you’ve never had….” snob

Some bish tries to pull this on you, sideswipe them with a simple yet classic one-up maneuver.

In this particular case, I like to pull out the red sancerre card.

I choose you, red Sancerre!

I choose you, Sancerre Rouge

**      **      **      **      **      **

Steps of service in one-upping a snob:

Snob: “Oh you’ve never had Dkaizfivnoeapiozejwia?”

You: *nod*, *smile*, *glance away like you see something more interesting than this stupid conversation*, “What about red Sancerre? That’s fabulous.”

Note: Under any circumstance, do not acknowledge the enemy and their petty suggestion as to what you should be drinking. They’re wrong. The end.

Snob

**      **      **      **      **      **

FYI red Sancerre/Sancerre rouge is pinot noir (remember this fact with “Noir from the Loire”, it rhymes, easy peasy). Without getting into too much detail, Sancerre rouge is a light-bodied red that’s super drinkable, most often affordable and impossible to dislike. It’s like the Uniqlo of wine.

Oh, what about producers they (/you) ask? Well, in any area where I’m unfamiliar and making sweeping statements about grandiose subjects (i.e., wine suggestions à la minute, the Korea demilitarized zone, etc.) I always go with my buddy Kermit.

kermit

Wrong Kermit.

No, not that Kermit, my friend. I’m talking about the one, the only, Kermit Lynch.

Kermit Lynch, the right choice those who can't make a choice.

Kermit Lynch, the right choice for those who can’t make a choice.

I could write for eons about dear Kermie but for now I will merely say his selections are superior and should always be trusted. If it’s imported by Kermit, it’s sure to be a swell swig.

Some of Kermit’s red Sancerres include:

Domaine Hippolyte Reverdy

domainehippoylteand

Daniel Chotard

danielchotard

Continuer s’il vous plait.

2. The Pairing snob

White with fish, red with meat is one of the most rudimentary pairing rules people learn early on and for those who stick to this particularly binding rule, that person is likely to develop quite a pairing snob complex.

These people will most often try and trick you by getting you to flub on the stereotypichal-but-not-always-true primary pairing rule of white and red wines. Public school sluts.

Add people who follow traditional wine rules to that list, Ja'mie.

Add: People who follow traditional wine rules to that list

First of all, there are plenty of other way better pairing rules to go by like “If it grows together, it goes together” (i.e. suggesting pairing regional foods with regional wines).

Truth be told, pairing rules are not always what they appear

Notastheyappear

Thus, when you are put in such a predicament by a pairing snob – here are go-to wines for when someone decides they want to wear drink white after labor day.

**      **      **      **      **      **

Reds for traditionally white wine foods

  • Pinot Noir – preferably California or Oregon but a red Burgundy could fly too as long as it’s not too funky
  • Beaujolais
  • Barbera d’Alba
  • Rioja
  • light-bodied Chianti – but choose wisely

Whites for traditionally red wine foods

  • Riesling
  • Gewurztraminer – one from Alsace would be preferred
  • Sherry – oloroso or amontillado
  • Viognier
  • Pinot Gris
  • Greco di Tufo – especially with pork
  • Chardonnay – varying degrees of oakiness could work

**      **      **      **      **      **

Although these suggestions are strictly based on the main protein you will be eating, there are more ways to circumvent this particular form of snob that we shall address at another time. (Preview suggestions: disregard the protein and focus on the sauce and/or protein preparation when it comes time to choose the wine pairing.)

3. The “This is corked” snob

True, it is said that perhaps 1 in 100 bottles of wine are corked.

youdontsay

You’ll know if a wine is corked aka tainted with TCA aka 2,4,6- trichloroanisole because it smells like (to varying degrees depending on the amount of contamination) wet cardboard that has been sitting in deep, dark, dank cellar for an extended period of time.

got vom

Even this most experienced wine drinker wants to be like

THEREFORE/HOWEVER whilst speaking in terms of snobbery, let’s say this person is totally WRONG. What drove them to this damning declaration of cockiness corkiness?

Maybe their tastes just weren’t as sophisticated as they thought. Maybe their enthusiasm in ordering the most expensive wine on the menu (most likely that Grand Cru Red Burgundy bought on auction for a gazillion doll hairs) was met with a bottle whose flavor profile resembled an earth pie made by mixing 1 part fresh dirt, 2 parts pig’s blood (fresh not frozen), 1/8th horse manure, and a sprinkle of unicorn. Delicious, yet not for the inexperienced.

And you can't taste the difference between corked and properly aged wines.

And you can’t taste the difference between corked and properly cellared wines.

If this is the scenario you find yourself in, and the snob did indeed order this allegedly-corked-not-actually-corked wine, then the snob is most likely paying for it (no credit card roulette please). Thus, give a knowing eye to the Somm, acknowledging you know what they know, and move along with your meal.

Build a bridge, get over it, and let this snob suffer the tragic consequences of their actions.

dorsia2

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